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The News

FCC Notes Amateur Radio Response to Haitian Earthquake:

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In a posting on January 28 to the FCC's blog, Mindel DeLaTorre -- the Commission's International Bureau Chief -- noted how Amateur Radio operators are assisting with communications support in earthquake ravaged Haiti. "The amateur radio community is also contributing to the relief efforts," she wrote.

Read more: eHam.net News

 

Amateurlogic Episode 26 Released:

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In this first episode of the year, George shows us how to use the Kenwood TS-2000 as a Software Defined Radio with Winrad. Peter experiments with the WSPR Weak Signal mode. And Tommy teaches us how to easily create Time Lapse Videos. Plus plenty of viewer email. Its 44:04 of AmateurLogic fun.

Read more: eHam.net News

 

SKorean, US firms embroiled in chip espionage case (AP)

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In this photo taken Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2010, Byun Chan-woo, right, a public prosecutor, briefs their investigation about memory chips at district prosecutors' office in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2010. The world's top producers of computer memory chips are embroiled in an apparent case of industrial espionage after South Korean prosecutors indicted 18 people over alleged technology theft. Prosecutors said those involved, including employees of U.S. company Allied Materials and its South Korean unit, are suspected of leaking semiconductor technology belonging to South Korea's Samsung Electronics Co. to its domestic rival Hynix Semiconductor Inc. (AP Photo/Shin Jun-hee, Yonhap)AP - The world's top producers of computer memory chips are embroiled in an apparent case of industrial espionage after South Korean prosecutors indicted 18 people over alleged technology theft.


Read more: Yahoo! News: Technology News

 

Is blogging a slog? Some young people think so (AP)

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Chart shows teen and adult blogging trends over time.AP - Could it be that blogs have become online fodder for the — gasp! — more mature reader?


Read more: Yahoo! News: Technology News

 

Microphone No Different Than Cell Phone:

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CB and HAM radio users must conform to new legislation: KAWARTHA LAKES - Local police are advising amateur CB and ham radio users to adhere to the new driver distraction legislation, saying a microphone is no different than a cellphone. However, the MTO said if those radios are being used to assist in an emergency situation, users are covered under three-year exemption until January 1, 2013. City of Kawartha Lakes Police Service Acting Staff Sergeant Kirk Robertson told the Lindsay Post on Tuesday (Feb. 2) that in non-emergency situations "they should be pulling over to the side of the road." He said there was a three-year phase out on the use of hand-held two-way radios for police, fire, emergency medical services, the public service and commercial vehicles, such as transport trucks - to allow for the development of hands-free solutions - but that did not extend to amateur radio users who are simply communicating. Ernie Roylance, treasurer of the Victoria Haliburton Amateur Radio Association, said that was his understanding as well. "It's the same as a cell phone. A microphone is a hand-held device," he said. He said ham radio and CB operators will also have to wait until hands-free solutions are developed for their older radios.

Read more: eHam.net News

 

ARNewsline #1694 -- January 29 2010:

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The following is a Q-S-T. Hams in Hawaii gear up to back a law that will insure their right to operate mobile, earthquake relief efforts in Haiti switch from HF to VHF, the ARRL Board discuses a lot of rescue radio and accolades from the QCWA to a ham who has given his entire life to the hobby, His name is Harry Dannals, his call is W2HD, and you can find out the details on Amateur Radio Newsline report number 1694 coming your way right now.

Read more: eHam.net News

 

MARS Unifies Operation in Support of Haiti Relief Effort

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To assist the MARS communications support effort in Haiti, the heads of the Army, Air Force, and Navy-Marine Corps MARS programs have agreed to divvy up responsibilities among the three Service MARS programs. According to Air Force MARS Public Information Officer David Trachtenberg, N4WWL/AFA3TR, this delegation of responsibility will facilitate more efficient utilization of MARS communications assets in the overall relief operation. On January 12, a 7.0 earthquake struck Haiti, killing thousands and wiped out the island nation's communication infrastructure.

Read more: ARRL Amateur Radio News

 

Ham Radio Included in Official Emergency Preparations:

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Local low-frequency operators get space in county's emergency dispatch center: MEDFORD : After an earthquake rocked Haiti to its foundation in January, only amateur radio operators were left to relay vital messages in the immediate aftermath to emergency service centers throughout the country. While local emergency officials are certain Southern Oregon would fare better in a major natural disaster, they were happy to give ham radio operators a spot in the county's new Emergency Operations Dispatch Center near the Medford airport. "In times of disaster, we can use all the help we can get," Jackson County Sheriff Mike Winters said. "The ham radio folks can help assist us in communications if our radios are shut down." The space provided to ham radio is nearly complete, with operators ready to fire up their old-school equipment in the coming weeks, said Bill Anderson, the assistant emergency coordinator for the Jackson County Amateur Radio Emergency Service (JCARES). "We hope we're not needed, but we will be ready when the time comes," Anderson said. Anderson is one of 25 members of JCARES who take time out of their personal schedules to train in emergency radio procedures in the case of a natural disaster.

Read more: eHam.net News

 

Ham Radio Operators From the Bay Area Head to Haiti:

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Dade City, Florida -- A Bay area group is lending a helping hand in Haiti by using ham radios to assist those in need. Gary Mentro has been a ham radio operator since 1977 and now he's joining a support team that will assist with communications in Port-au-Prince. "I will be a part of the third team and at this point, I may be the sole member of the team. They're now talking about reducing the number of personnel," said Mentro. Mentro was touched by the devastation that took place in the country and after he saw kids suffering, he wanted to do something to help.

Read more: eHam.net News

 

Cave-Texting Device Involves Combination of Computer and Ham Radio:

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Teen Inventor's Cave Radio Could Save Lives Deep Underground: Science fair projects don't get much cooler than a texting device that broke the record for deepest underground digital communication in the United States. Such a device may help save people trapped deep underground and even allow scientists to conduct remote cave research, all thanks to a teen inventor from Los Alamos, New Mexico. NPR took a firsthand look at the deep, dark foray. Alexander Kendrick, 16, headed to Carlsbad Caverns National Park in New Mexico to test his device almost 1,000 feet underground. His invention involves a computer attached to a ham radio that transmits data using low-frequency radio waves. By contrast, high-frequency transmissions used in FM broadcasts have a harder time penetrating solid rock. Kendrick's team climbed down to 946 feet, before they assembled a 6-foot-wide radio antenna out of PVC tubing and wire. Kendrick's dad had hiked to a spot directly above the team on the surface and awaited a message.

Read more: eHam.net News

 

300 Feet of Cooperation

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A positive approach earns Georgia hams some state owned tower space.

Read more: ARRL Amateur Radio News

 

NCVEC Releases Second Technician Question Pool

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In January, the Question Pool Committee (QPC) of the National Conference of Volunteer Examiner Coordinators (NCVECreleased the 2010 Technician (Element 2) Question Pool. Upon further review of the pool, members of the QPC found and corrected more than 50 minor typographical errors and clarified the questions and answers, making them easier to understand. These adopted changes are now incorporated in a revised question pool. The errata list, as well as the revised Technician question pool, is available on the NCVEC Web site. The previously released pool dated January 4, 2010 is invalid for use. The newly revised Technician question pool will become effective for all examinations administered on or after July 1, 2010; it will remain valid until June 30, 2014. The current Technician question pool that became effective July 1, 2006 will expire June 30, 2010. The new Technician pool contains approximately 400 questions, from which 35 are selected for an Element 2 examination; it will contain graphics and diagrams, something new for this element. The current General class question pool was effective July 1, 2007 and is valid through June 30, 2011. The current Amateur Extra class pool was effective July 1, 2008 and is valid until June 30, 2012.

Read more: ARRL Amateur Radio News

 

2010 Field Day Packets Now Available

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It’s that time of year again -- time to start gearing up for ARRL Field Day, June 26-27, 2010! ARRL’s flagship operating event -- always held the fourth full weekend in June -- brings together new and experienced hams for 24 hours of operating fun. Field Day packets are now available for download and include the complete rules (including changes for 2010), as well as other reference items such as forms, ARRL Section abbreviation list, entry submission instructions, a Frequently Asked Questions section, guidelines for getting bonus points, instructions for GOTA stations, a kit to publicize your event with the local press and more.

Read more: ARRL Amateur Radio News

 

Illinois Teams with Amateur Radio Operators to Create RACES Program

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A newly forged partnership between Amateur Radio operators throughout the state of Illinois and the Illinois Emergency Management Agency (IEMA) will provide an additional layer of emergency communications during disasters. The agreement creates the State Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Services (RACES) program. Under the agreement, IEMA Director Andrew Velasquez appointed ARRL Illinois Section Emergency Coordinator Brad Pioveson, W9FX, of Benton as the volunteer State RACES Officer. Pioveson will serve as the single point of contact between IEMA and the Illinois Amateur Radio community.

Read more: ARRL Amateur Radio News

 

Ham Radio Operator Ready to Help in Disasters:

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LAKE STEVENS -- When people across the country turned their attention to TV screens broadcasting news from Haiti after the quake, Frank Remington turned on his amateur radio. A network providing emergency communications for the Salvation Army called out for volunteers to help handle emergency messages from the country. Remington, 68, a skilled radio operator with more than 40 years of experience, was up for the challenge. Meanwhile, voices were coming through, making contact with Remington. A priest off the coast of Haiti. A search and rescue team from South Africa whose plane just landed in Port-Au-Prince. A doctor who was looking for an armed guard to help a nurse deliver insulin for a diabetic patient. Staying tuned in from his Lake Stevens home, the retired Boeing worker wondered what would happen if the unspeakable happened right here in Snohomish County. "It makes you wonder, how prepared are we," he said. "When all else fails, amateur radio operators are going to be the ones to supply communications." Remington is part of a specially trained group that works directly with the county's Department of Emergency Management to help with search and rescue operations and other missions in case of disaster. Few people know that hospitals and city halls are equipped with a radio, he said. It can be a lifeline in an emergency. Remington has a generator and his car is equipped with a radio transmitter. A special license plate bears his call sign, a unique code issued to ham radio operators. If a crisis hits home, he will be ready. Amateur radio operators, or hams, have to be licensed with the Federal Communications Commission. Remington first got his license in 1961. As a young boy, he lived next door to a ham and became interested in the hobby.

Read more: eHam.net News

 

Amateur Radio Still Alive and Kicking:

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Before the invention of the Internet, cell phones or text messaging, if there was a disaster, the main way to get emergency information was via the radio. Despite advances in technology, people still turn to the radio when usual forms of contact are lost. Even if weather conditions are fine and dandy, operating on the radio works much the same way as cell phones, text messages and chat rooms, offering people a chance to communicate with anyone across the globe. "If an emergency occurs, we can be activated to provide communication for an emergency event or a scheduled event," said Herb Pettit, president of the Central Kentucky Amateur Radio Society. "A lot of the members participate in the weather spotter program," he said. "The National Weather Service provides us training on reporting a storm." Pettit, who has been involved in amateur radio for six years, said he uses the radio on a daily basis. Other club members, such as Mike Rogers, also use the radio every day, not only to stay informed and to inform others, but to communicate with old friends or meet new ones. "We're able to talk to people around the world," said Rogers, 61, who first became interested in amateur radio when he was in high school and was introduced to the medium by his uncle. "We talk to a lot of people we've never seen before or heard before, but the nice thing is we all share the same hobby," Rogers said. "Any time I'm driving, I have the radio on and if I hear someone, I'll chime in and talk to them." Amateur radio is not only for those who enjoy speaking to others. Morse Code still is widely used.

Read more: eHam.net News

 

QRP Quarterly -- Winter 2010 Issue:

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The latest QRP Quarterly (journal of the QRP Amateur Radio Club International) is being delivered this week. Not interested in QRP ? Actually QQ is not all about low power - it caters for real hams who build their own rigs, it has features for those who like to take their radios on backpacking trips, it looks at cutting edge technologies to make those global 2-way 5 Watt contacts possible . . .

Read more: eHam.net News

 

Phil Salas, AD5X, Wins January QST Cover Plaque Award

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The winner of the QST Cover Plaque Award for January is Phil Salas, AD5X, for his article “160 and 80 Meter Matching Network for Your 43 Foot Vertical -- Part 2.” Congratulations, Phil! The winner of the QST Cover Plaque award -- given to the author or authors of the best article in each issue -- is determined by a vote of ARRL members on the QST Cover Plaque Poll Web page. Cast a ballot for your favorite article in the February issue by Sunday, February 28.

Read more: ARRL Amateur Radio News

 

It Seems to Us: Where Are the Spots?

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Sunspots, that is. Those of us who follow solar activity the way most people follow the weather had expected that by now our Sun would have developed a nice pox. Instead, we seem to be stuck in a trough of low solar activity.

Read more: ARRL Amateur Radio News

 

This Week in Amateur Radio #877 - Week of 1/31/10

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Edition #877 of This Week in Amateur Radio, and This Week in Amateur Radio Headline News, have been released. Both are now posted and available for download at www.twiar.org. Subscribe on our site or: FIND US NOW ON I-TUNES! --> You can also direct download through our portal for web enabled devices (PS3, Blackberry, etc) at www.kxkvi.blogspot.com. Visit our blog at www.twiari.blogspot.com. This Week in Amateur Radio Full Version with special features and all the latest news - Running time: 69 minutes. This Week in Amateur Radio Headline News version runs 58 minutes with limited special features. This Week in Amateur Radio is available for regular download at our web site in MP3 format. Streaming audio is also available, as is RSS/XML subscriptions for the podcast. Enjoy, and see you next week! de George - W2XBS This Week in Amateur Radio

Read more: This Week in Amateur Radio Podcast

 

Radio Operators Are the Eyes of the National Weather Service:

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Even in the age of high-powered Doppler radar, instant communications and the Internet, the National Weather Service and local safety officials still rely heavily on old methods for accurate observations and emergency communications. Volunteer amateur -- or ham -- radio operators still play a primary role in providing on-site information about tornadoes and storm conditions to weather forecasters and letting emergency responders know what's going on. "There's nothing like ground troops," said Keith Wells, assistant coordinator with the Tarrant County Office of Emergency Management, who was helping the National Weather Service on Saturday at the annual Skywarn storm spotter training session at Texas Christian University. "One of the most important things we do all year is train the spotters," Wells said. "When you have a trained observer on the ground at Bryant Irvin Road reporting golf-ball-sized hail or a funnel cloud, that really tells a meteorologist what's going on."

Read more: eHam.net News

 

Catching Amateur Radio Signals From Hotel Balcony:

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In mid-January, I traveled to Phoenix, Ariz., for a work-related conference. Though I knew I'd have very little free time on the three-day outing (including travel), the opportunity to gather some signals in a far-away location was one I could not pass up. Packing a Grundig G5 portable receiver, a Uniden Bearcat 246T scanner and Pinnacle USB digital TV tuner made for an array that fit in my carry-on and still covered local emergency communications, AM/FM, longwave, shortwave and over-the-air TV signals. I opted not to bring any antennas beyond the stock whips attached to each receiver and no amateur radio gear, given that I'd likely have less than a couple of hours to operate. From my hotel balcony in suburban Scottsdale, I did find some surprises.

Read more: eHam.net News

 


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